Washington Post’s updated property search app is helpful . . . with this caveat

January 31, 2013 — More data is becoming available to the public and folks savvy enough to use Internet apps to capture information on home sales have an updated local tool to use.

Here comes the The Washington Post with an updated version of its home search app for use on desktop computers and certain mobile devices.

As Real Estate Writer Kathy Orton described it earlier this week,  The Post used to rely only on data supplied by the counties. Now, through the MRIS service, it receives home-sale data within days, instead of months.

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This is how the home search tool appeared on January 31, 2013. CREDIT: The Washington Post

A quick caveat: the home sale price logged with the county does not take into accout what the Net Sale Price was. The Net Sale Price includes any adjustments at closing, including “givebacks” by the sellter to help consumate the deal. More often than not, the Net Sale Price is lower than the stated sale price.

The Post intends for you to be able to easily search by city, neighborhood or map point. “You can search single-family homes, condos or townhouses. You can search by the selling agent’s name. You won’t be able to find out the names of the buyers or sellers on the most recently sold properties,” Orton wrrote. MRIS doesn’t provide The Post with that data. You still have to wait for the county to give them that information or find it on your own on a county web site.

The Post says this tool can tell buyers “exactly what price a home sold for, which is much more relevant than what it was listed for.” As a reader of my blog you know now that’s only part of the picture, per my caveat outlined above.

The Post also says a buyer can search for the sales price of all the one-bedroom, one-bath condos on a particular street in order to know whether the condo they are thinking about buying is over- or under-priced.  But after a few searches using my laptop I found townhomes coming up after I specified only single family homes. I could not find the search function via my iPhone. (If you do, please let me know.)

Every new app is bound to have a few glitches. Let’s hope The Post fixes them quickly, especially as the Spring sales season approaches.

Bottom line: take all this with a rock of salt. More information is good, provided you know exactly what it means, and leaves out.

I do think it’s helpful for homeowners thinking about selling to be able to see what homes in their neighborhood sold for recently. They can use it to help validate their listing price provided you know any differences between the two properties, e.g. is one far more up-to-date than the other.

The Post says this app is to be made “Facebook friendly.” Orton writes it will update and expand this feature based on reader feedback. I’ve posted my feedback at the end of the article, you should too.

You deserve a market information provided by an experienced professional. Call me at 703-593-9432 or start with the MLS search function and / or Free Market Report service on my home page.

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Loudoun residents: keep an eye on location for proposed Hounds baseball stadium

December 5, 2012 — Are you as surprised as I about plans by developers to re-locate a planned minor league baseball stadium to the southwest corner of Leesburg Pike and the Loudoun County Parkway?

It would be a defining feature of the “One Loudoun” town center development that once envisioned something similar to the Reston Town Center. To some some of my clients, it just about destroys the very concept of a town center. Others say ‘bring it on!’

What do you think?

This is where One Loudoun developers want to locate a minor league baseball park at the southwest corner of Leesburg Pike and the Loudoun CountyParkway. CREDIT: One Loudoun

This is where One Loudoun developers want to locate a minor league baseball park at the southwest corner of Leesburg Pike and the Loudoun County Parkway. CREDIT: One Loudoun

Residents of the nearby Potomac Green neighborhood have organized “No Stadium on 7”  to take on the project which may include a soccer stadium. At the same time, several area residents are looking forward to that location hosting a minor league team, the Hounds.

According to this report Sunday, Dec. 2, 2012 in The Washington Post the stadium would replace an office building and move from its originally-planned location as the centerpiece of the Kincora Village Center on Route 28. that is where the Loudoun Board of Supervisors first approved the stadium in 2009.

The would-be owner and operator of the stadium, VIP Sports and Entertainment, says its committed to being a good community neighbor. We’ll see.

At the center of the emerging debate is Supervisor Shawn Williams, R-Broad Run. Based on the report in the Post, Williams seems poised to support it. If all questions about noise, traffic and lighting can’t be worked out, he said he’ll withdraw that support.

Look for traffic and environmental studies by Friday, Dec. 14. If officials approve, construction could begin very quickly.

Here’s a sample of how each side sees the problem, or the opportunity:

One commenter about the Post’s story, ‘Mammaof4,’ said this:

Won’t the stadium raise property values? Isnt’ the intersection already busy? It’s not like this is going in the middle of a quiet little neighborhood or a thriving forest. I don’t get the opposition. Celebrate it – Loudoun the land of single family house upon single family house is getting some real mixed-use to go with its metro. This is awesome for the community. Time to rally around this and be thankful. If you want quiet, you move out to western LoCo away from mass transit and major roads.

And then there was the opposite point-of-view from ‘Revo1’:

A stadium is a terrible idea. Where are all these people going to park? Oh, that’s right. In the places where people going to the Alamo Draft House and other more welcome businesses in One Loudoun would be expecting to park. The last thing Loudoun needs is professional sports. It is a joke of the worst sort to say with a straight face that a stadium that can hold 10,000 people (or even 5,500 seated) will cause less traffice than a 4-story office building.  STOP THE STADIUM NOW!!!